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Current Affairs MCQ for UPSC Exams – 17 March 2017

Q1 - Which of the following is/are correct regarding National Health Policy, 2017?

1. Reducing Under Five Mortality to 23 by 2020
2. Maternal Mortality Ratio from current levels to 100 by 2020
3. Infant Mortality Rate to 28 by 2020
A. 1,2 only
B. 2,3 only
C. 2 only
D. 1,3 only
Q2 - Consider the following statement about VVPAT is/are correct?

1. All elections except local bodies election uses VVPAT
2. VVPAT machine specially designed by the BHEL
A. 1 only
B. 2 only
C. Both
D. None

Q3 - Which of the following city is not selected for Mobilise Your City (MYC) programme?

A. Delhi
B. Nagpur
C. Ahmedabad
D. Kochi.
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Answer 1-C,2-D,3-A

Notable agriculture initiatives discussed at COP 22

Agriculture is part of the solution in the fight against climate change—this was the sentiment echoed by various stakeholders gathered at COP 22 in Marrakech.

This is established by their respective climate action plans or Intended Nationally Determined Contributions. Almost 95 per cent of countries covered agriculture, and 89 per cent discussed water management in their plans. Most of the countries have considered agriculture among their adaptation or mitigation priorities to help limit global temperature rise, in line with the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

Working towards sustainable agriculture also addresses other global challenges: fighting hunger and malnutrition and sustainable management of natural resources and ecosystems. However, the progress made at COP 22 related on agriculture was very slow and the issues related to agriculture will now be discussed in May 2017.

Three new initiatives discussed at COP 22 highlight the potential in agricultural adaptation: Adaptation of…

Marrakech climate talks produced defiance towards Trump, but little else (downtoearth,)

In many ways, the Marrakech climate summit was entirely ordinary. As is usually the case, the first week was spent drowning in technical detail while most of the second was dedicated to photo opportunities and political speeches. And as always the negotiations ran over time, finishing early on Saturday morning.

But while this latest “Conference of the Parties” (COP) was intended to be an “action COP”, aimed at getting down to the business of implementing the Paris Climate Agreement reached last year, it will mainly be remembered as the “Trump COP”. It was a summit held under the spectre of renewed US climate recalcitrance in the wake of the surprise election result, which dropped like a bombshell on the summit’s third day.

The main topic of debate in the first week was the creation of a “Paris Rulebook”, set to be finalised by the end of 2018. The Paris Agreement sets up a loose skeleton for a pledge-and-review system of deepening emissions-reduction targets over the coming decades. …

FacebookTwitterPinterestLinkedIn BOOKMARK Does a new era of bleaching beckon for Indi an Ocean coral reefs? (downtoearth,)

Despite extensive media coverage, campaigns and scientists’ warnings, still the world is not fully aware of what coral bleaching is and why it is happening. Mention bleaching and some think that it is the death of the Great Barrier Reef’s coral, but the problem is much more widespread. The Conversation

“Bleaching” is when corals lose the highly productive algae (termed zooxanthellae) from their tissues due to stress from high sea temperatures and solar irradiation. The algae and coral have a symbiotic relationship: the algae remove the coral’s waste products while the coral gives the algae a safe environment to live in, and provides compounds for photosynthesis. Without the algae, the coral no longer has a sufficient source of food, meaning that it essentially starves to death.

Due to its iconic status and numerous nearby scientific institutes, the Great Barrier Reef often receives the most attention when it comes to coral bleaching. But there are many other reefs across the globe th…

National health policy 2017: A road map for health (Hindu)

Affordable, quality health care for all requires more human resources and cost control

The National Health Policy 2017, which the Centre announced this week after a nudge from the Supreme Court last year, faces the challenging task of ensuring affordable, quality medical care to every citizen. With a fifth of the world’s disease burden, a growing incidence of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, and poor financial arrangements to pay for care, India brings up the rear among the BRICS countries in health sector performance. Against such a laggardly record, the policy now offers an opportunity to systematically rectify well-known deficiencies through a stronger National Health Mission. Among the most glaring lacunae is the lack of capacity to use higher levels of public funding for health. Rectifying this in partnership with the States is crucial if the Central government is to make the best use of the targeted government spending of 2.5% of GDP by 2025, up from 1.15% now. Altho…