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Current Affairs MCQ for UPSC Exams – 14 July 2017

Q- Which of the following matters does not come within the jurisdiction of National Green tribunal (NGT)?

1. biodiversity
2. Carbon emmission
3. forests
4. water pollution


Q- Which of the following is correct regarding India’s renewable energy targets.

1. India plans to make 175 Gigawatts by 2022
2. Of the target capacity, 100 GW would be from solar power.
3. 60 GW from biomass
A. 1,2
B. 2,3
C. 1,3
D. All


Q- The Economic Survey is complied by:

a) Office of economic advisor.
b) Central Statistical office ( CSO )
c) National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO)
d) Department of economic affairs..
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Answer  1-(3),  2-A,  3-D

In just three years, chikungunya cases in India increased by 390 per cent (downtoearth)

Till May 2017, India has witnessed over 19,113 cases of dengue and chikungunya. The season for such vector-borne diseases peaks in monsoon months and continues till November. Even though outbreak of vector-borne diseases was on the rise in 2016-17, the Centre spent just 68 per cent of funds under the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP), shows State of India’s Environment 2017 In Figures. Around Rs 163.48 crore (16,348 lakh) allocated under the NVBDCP was not released and hence, remained unspent.

Credit: State of India's Environment 2017 In Figures
Credit: State of India's Environment 2017 In Figures

A further analysis of the government data shows that although gap between amount allocated and released has reduced since 2013-14 (the UPA regime), the implementation mechanism seems to have definitely faltered in the financial year 2016-17.

In just three years (2014 to 2016), there has been around 300-400 per cent increase in incidences of chikungunya and 280…

Liver fibrosis can be detected through blood test: new study ()downtoearth,

Doctors have long been using biopsy to diagnose liver fibrosis. A new study says it may be possible to diagnose the liver disease with a blood test in future.

Researchers at the All India Institute of Medical Science (AIIMS), New Delhi, working in collaboration with Justus Liebig University in Germany, have identified diagnostic markers for liver fibrosis. With these markers, it will be possible to diagnose liver fibrosis from blood samples. It will make diagnosis easier to perform, non-invasive, and less prone to sampling errors, researchers say in their study published in journal Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology.

The new study has reported that patients of liver fibrosis have elevated levels of two proteins—Cathepsin L and Cathepsin B—in liver tissues as well as blood plasma, compared to healthy people. The increased levels of these two proteins open the possibility of designing a new and better diagnosis for liver disease. There is progressive increase in concentrations…

A looming threat: on the TB crisis (.hindu)

All children diagnosed with TB must get paediatric fixed-dose combination drugs

About 5,500 of over 76,000 children tested in nine Indian cities have been diagnosed with tuberculosis, 9% of them with multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB), highlighting the silent spread of the disease. Though the actual prevalence of MDR-TB among children in India is not known, the results from a limited number of children tested in this sample, under the Revised National TB Control Programme, is worrying. According to a 2015 study, of the over 600 children who had tested positive for TB in four cities, about 10% showed resistance to Rifampicin, a first-line drug. Since the incidence of TB among children is a reflection of the prevalence of the disease in the community at large, the high prevalence of both drug-sensitive TB and drug-resistant TB in children from these nine cities is a grim reminder of the failure of the health-care system to diagnose the disease early enough in adults and start them on tre…